Didn’t your mom teach you how to share properly?

Maybe you were scanning through emails yesterday, or checkings your Facebook news feed, and you found a funny picture that you just had to share with your cyber friends and followers.  So you click the picture, save it to your page and pat yourself on the back for finding such a great piece of work! Right?

WRONG!

Without properly citing the photo, you are violating the original creator’s creative commons practices.  A creative commons license builds upon the traditional copyright practices.  The license lets you dictate how others can use your pieces of work.  The creative commons license allows you to keep copyright but also allows others to copy and distribute your work IF they give you proper credit.  They do no have to seek permission to share your work as long as they cite that it is, in fact, your work.  Creative commons and copyright may have their similarities but the two practices are separate entities.  Copyright defines ownership and gives the author rights to financial benefits.  It also stops others from using the author’s work without their very specific permission.

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In my research on creative commons, I found the Flickr website utilizes various creative commons efforts.  Flickr is an online photo and video managment system, which also gives users and opportunity to share their work with others in an organization manner.  Flickr gives its users the option to add creative commons licensing to their photostreams.  They have four types of creative commons licensures:

1. Attribution – You allow others to copy, distribute, display, perform cc_icon_attribution_gifyour copyrighted work and works based upon it but only if they give you credit for it.

2. Noncommercial – You allow others to copy, distribute, display, cc_icon_noncomm_gifperform your work and works based upon it but for noncommercial use only.

3. No Derivative Works – You allow others to copy, distribute, display, cc_icon_noderivs_gifperform only verbatim copies of your work.  Works based upon yours are not allowed to be copied, distributed, displayed, performed.

4. Share Alike – You allow others to distribute works based on yours cc_icon_sharealike_gifonly under a license identical to the license that is placed on your work.

Flickr users can utlize any combination of the above licenses to help protect their work and give credit where it is due.  It is important to protect your work with creative commons because it is just that – your work!

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3 Comments

  1. Kate,
    Another great introductory paragraph and title.

    You did a great job of introducing the reader as to why they should give producers of content such as video, graphics and more credit. My favorite opening in your post:

    “Maybe you were scanning through emails yesterday, or checkings your Facebook news feed, and you found a funny picture that you just had to share with your cyber friends and followers. So you click the picture, save it to your page and pat yourself on the back for finding such a great piece of work!”

    You hit it right on the nail with this opening. It speaks so well to what people are doing, intentionally or unintentionally.

    And more importantly, your bullet points made it easy for the reader to read and understand first hand how Creative Commons is different from Copyrights.

    Kuddos Kate!

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  2. I really like your title also….very creative!! Addressing the different types of creative commons licenses makes this post clear and concise about the benefits each type of license provides. Your opening paragraph also discusses an act that i am sure many of us have experienced, never giving second thought to the fact that we may, potentially, be held liable for violating the rights of someones work. Good post!

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  3. What a clever title! It caught my attention and made me want to read the post right away. Nice job. Your description of CC and how it differs from copyrighting had just the right amount of detail, which made it really easy to understand. It’s interesting that you brought up Flickr because I used it as an example in my post as well – check it out!

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